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Make sure your USDA certified organic milk is TRULY Organic!

June 9, 2015
photo of  grazing cow by Cedar Summit Farm in New Prague, MN. Cedar Summit Farm is a 100% organic, grass-fed dairy farm owned by the  Minar family.  (creative commons license)

Grazing cow on Cedar Summit Farm in New Prague, MN. Cedar Summit is a 100% organic, grass-fed dairy farm owned by the Minar family. (Photo shared through the creative commons license).

According to an action alert released by The Cornucopia Institute* on June 9, 2015, the USDA will soon be voting whether to close major loopholes in organic milk certification regulations that currently allow conventional cows on organic farms.

When you buy organic milk certified by USDA, you trust that you are receiving a product that does not contain GMOs, pesticides or antibiotics right?  Well current loopholes within organic certification laws are endangering the quality of your milk. Farms who wish to be certified as organic are allowed a one-time transition period to convert their conventionally raised cows to organic standards. After this period is completed, all new cows on their farm must be raised on organic milk and feed—even before they are born. This ensures that the milk you pour on your cereal each morning is well and truly organic.

But factory farms have been abusing this transition period by adding conventionally raised cows to organic herds. According to the Cornucopia Institute, these cows have been “raised on medicated milk replacer that includes antibiotics, and fed GMO grains and hay treated with toxic pesticides.

If we want to make sure our USDA certified organic milk continues to meet the standards we demand for our family’s and our own health we need to hold the USDA accountable!

Learn more about these dangerous loopholes and how to submit a public comment to the USDA on the Cornucopia Institute’s webpage.

The USDA is accepting public comments until July 27, 2015.

*The Cornucopia Institute is an amazing non-profit research organization working to support family farms, organic food and sustainable agriculture by providing the public, media and policymakers with relevant information to help inform decisions about our food and health, and the ecological systems which support them.

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